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Posts tagged "Okanogan Conservation District"
State audit highlights timing issues in fire-recovery funding

State audit highlights timing issues in fire-recovery funding

State and local conservation districts that assist property owners with recovery after a wildfire or other disaster sometimes struggle to get projects approved and completed before funding expires. In fact, sometimes they have only a few months to get everything completed. The districts also face limitations because state law requires that only a fraction of the...
Reviewing options for ravaged watershed

Reviewing options for ravaged watershed

Risks from erosion, mudslides and floods remain high in the Benson Creek watershed, which was ravaged by wildfire and floods almost two years ago. Federal and state agency officials and conservation planners are exploring options for …
Conservancy names annual award winners

Conservancy names annual award winners

The Methow Conservancy announced the recipients of its 2015 Methow Conservation Awards at an event last week. Classroom in Bloom is the winner of the Ken White Award — honoring those who carry on Ken White’s love for the Methow Valley — in recognition of the program’s commitment to inspiring young people to understand agriculture, ecology, and natural history...
Conservation District seeking board members

Conservation District seeking board members

There are two openings on the board of supervisors of the Okanogan Conservation District. One is an elected position and the other will be appointed by the Washington State Conservation Commission. Conservation districts are subdivisions of state government, much like school boards. Each district is governed by five supervisors who serve voluntarily and without pay....
Community briefs: Nov. 4, 2015

Community briefs: Nov. 4, 2015

Get mobbed up this weekend Sometimes a mob mentality is not a bad thing, as when it’s for a good cause. Join the Methow Conservancy and the Okanogan County Electric Co-Op on Saturday (Nov.) 7 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for a Seed Mob to plant native grass seeds in areas disturbed during this...
Help is available to reduce erosion on burned properties

Help is available to reduce erosion on burned properties

In the aftermath of another devastating wildfire season, many area residents are anxious about protecting their homes and property from flash floods and mudslides that result when wildfires destroy vegetation and leave the ground charred, barren and unable to absorb water. There are many different ways to treat burned landscapes to reduce erosion, and the Okanogan...
Flood protection work proceeds in at-risk areas

Flood protection work proceeds in at-risk areas

The Texas Creek home of Tom and Cheryl Race was a bustling work site last week as trucks delivered many loads of gravel, which a bulldozer operator contoured into a large dike upstream from the house to protect it from future flooding. At the same time, a crew of eight Americorps volunteers shoveled away about 300...
Methow Valley Fund awards $70,480 to local nonprofits

Methow Valley Fund awards $70,480 to local nonprofits

The Methow Valley Fund, managed by the Community Foundation of North Central Washington, has recently awarded $70,480 in grants to Methow Valley nonprofits. Established in 2006, the Methow Valley Fund provides grant funding to charitable organizations that are meeting needs and developing strong, sustainable programs that enhance the Methow Valley. The fund is advised by...
Methow Valley residents given conservation district awards

Methow Valley residents given conservation district awards

Several Methow Valley residents have been recognized for their conservation work by the Okanogan Conservation District. Methow Valley rancher Craig Boesel received the Norm McClure Lifetime Achievement in Conservation Award for his work on watershed councils and with many organizations and fellow ranchers. Boesel also served two separate terms on the Conservation District’s board of...
Fires and floods: a natural progression

Fires and floods: a natural progression

By Ann McCreary and Marcy Stamper
Changes in soil from the intense heat of fire, along with a treacherous mix of ash and water, create a heightened risk of floods and mudslides in fire-damaged areas. When fires move across the surface of the ground, burning grasses and plants, the combustion of vegetation creates a...