Compiled by Marilyn Bardin

20 years ago — February 7, 1994
DRUG BATTLERS. Seventh graders, left to right Jocelyn Coe, Cory Loucks, Erin Torpey, Misty Gage, Ryan Ellis and Cameron Erkela, accompanied by deputy Kevin Murray, handed Dawn Eliassen of Liberty Bell Live, their D.A.R.E. public service announcements which will be played on the KVLR show. The recordings, made as an addition to the regular D.A.R.E. curriculum, can be heard at 15 and 45 past the hour during the student-run Monday 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. slot.

DRUG BATTLERS. Seventh graders, left to right Jocelyn Coe, Cory Loucks, Erin Torpey, Misty Gage, Ryan Ellis and Cameron Erkela, accompanied by deputy Kevin Murray, handed Dawn Eliassen of Liberty Bell Live, their D.A.R.E. public service announcements which will be played on the KVLR show. The recordings, made as an addition to the regular D.A.R.E. curriculum, can be heard at 15 and 45 past the hour during the student-run Monday 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. slot.

40 years ago — February 7, 1974
Women hoopsters continue to win

Methow Valley’s women’s basketball team ran their season record to 6–0 and winning streak to 16 straight wins with a pair of victories last week. The women easily defeated Omak 54-32 and then had to fight from 10 points back to nip Brewster at the end 34–32. Playing at the Okanogan Armory against Omak, Twisp ran up a 33-14 first half lead and coasted in with the win. Twisp hit 23 field goals and made 8 of 9 at the free throw line. All nine players contributed to the scoring.

60 years ago — February 4 , 1954
Twisp River woman recovers lost watch

Mrs. Joe Yocom was pleasantly surprised Tuesday when she came into the News office to place a classified ad for the recovery of a wrist watch which she had lost on the Twisp street, and found out the ad would be unnecessary.

A “found” ad had been brought in earlier in the day by David Austin, who had found the watch at the very place she had dropped it.

Mrs. Yocom had received the wrist watch only recently as a birthday present and was happy to get it back.

 Ed Rogers ill at Brewster hospital

Eddie Rogers is a patient at Brewster hospital, having been taken there Thursday night following a heart attack. He is in a serious condition but is reported to have taken some nourishment the past two days. Fred Homer is taking care of the service station with the help of the Rogers’ son, Hank.

 

80 years ago — February 2, 1934
Town’s new fire siren installed, and works

The new fire siren recently purchased by the Town of Twisp to replace the obsolete fire bell, has been fully installed and connected up with W.W.P. power lines, and is now in working order, the accepted and official instrument of fire alarm in Twisp.

The alarm is turned in by pressing a button in the box on the south side of the McAlister-Gibson store. In case of fire, the first individual reaching the alarm box is requested to turn in the alarm. Greatest efficiency will be obtained, it is explained by pressing the starter button and stop button at intervals.

The public is invited to visit and investigate this fire alarm box, so that anyone may quickly reach it and know how to turn in the alarm without hesitation in case of need. However, do not press the button to just see how it works, as that is forbidden. But you can get “location” merely looking it over, it is explained by our efficient town clerk.

The new siren makes a large noise.

 

100 years ago — February 6, 1914
Local

Monday was Groundhog Day. According to tradition, if the groundhog sees his shadow when he appears on this date, he returns to recluse for six weeks more. Well, we can try it out, for he sure saw his shadow, if the sun was not so bright and warm as to have made him snow blind.

It is reported that Mr. Jones, the “state inspector of telephone”, was doing business with local phone users the first of the week, particularly ascertaining if the phone service was giving satisfaction. Mr. Jones had a real pleasant voice, and calling up his victim, would ask him to stand as far as possible to the right and say “hello”, then to the left, then up high, but when the victim was asked to stand on his head and do this, there was generally rebellion, and usually, treats. And this same “Jones” still lives.