20 years ago  – October 28, 1993

history1

Winners of the Methow Valley News creative pumpkin decorating contest.

 

 

40 Years Ago – October 25, 1973

 

Christian Business Venture Introduces “Portable” Sawmill in Methow Valley

The sound of a sawmill operating in the Methow Valley is a familiar one, and much has been written about the men who harvest God’s gift to this beautiful valley.

The Second Mile Sawmill is owned and operated by a group of young Christian businessmen.

General Manager of the mill is Rod Parker. His managing partners are Bob Floyd and Min Labanauskas. Helping with the work are other men involved in the ranch operation.

The sawmill is very unique in that it is portable. It not only can be moved from one log to another during cutting operations on logs larger than 24” in diameter. Smaller logs are cut using a special end stand built for the mill.

The sawmill has become an economic resource for the group.

Bob Floyd says the mill can be cutting lumber within two hours after they arrive at the site. He figures they can cut over 2,000 bd. Ft. a day. He said that cost to the customer varies according to the dimensions of the finished lumber. However, for jobs that can utilize timber near the construction site, this is a very economical method.

The men welcome visitors to watch their sawmill in operation. There is always a friendly smile and a big hand waiting at the gate of Second Mile Ranch.

 

 

60 years ago –  October 22, 1953

 

Operation Sky Watch to Go On in Twisp Soon

The American Legion has purchased the old lookout building on Leecher Mountain and it will be moved soon to the end of the football field on the hill back of town where it will be used by volunteers of the Ground Observation Corps.

The Kiwanis club of Twisp is cooperating with the Legion in obtaining volunteers to man the post 24 hours a day. Shifts will be split up into two hours each with two on duty during each shift.

The women will have charge of the station during the day and they will also keep the records of watchers, and call each pair before they are scheduled for duty.

Fred Horner, Town Marshall, will be the coordinator of the local ground observer corps. However, the Legion is anxious to have enough volunteers lined up for the start of operations which will be in the very near future.

 

 

80 years ago –  October 24, 1933

 

The Twisp Theater

Saturday and Sunday, October 28 and 29. First National Presents “You Said a Mouthful”, with Joe E. Brown, supported by Ginger Rogers and Farina of “Our Gang” fame, and a gorgeous array of bathing beauties. A comedy riot of the year! Don’t Miss It!. Comedy. Musical Act. News. Admission 10 and 35 cents.

Carloads Red Caps Arriving for the Annual Deer Hunt

Car after car of red-capped passengers is now beginning to pour into the valley for the annual deer hunt, and parties are being made up for all sections of the valley.

There is to be an awful fusillade of light artillery beginning Sunday morning, sportsmen getting ready to take to the hills tomorrow.

Let us hope each hunter will be careful to look before he shoots, so that there will be no human life snuffed out by high-powered rifles. Take a chance on an empty bag rather than to risk a human life, and live long and happy ever after.

And good luck to everybody.

 

 

100 years ago –  October 24, 1913

 

The News family is indebted to B.W. Bonney for a fine mess of fish this week.

 

Extend Water System

The extension of the water system south on Division Avenue was completed the latter part of last week, upon the arrival of the water mains from Seattle, the lateral being laid to a point even with the brick school, enabling  the serving of that popular institution with good, pure water for drinking and sanitation.

Work was commenced bright and early Monday morning on the extension of the water system across the Twisp, the contract for which was let at the last council meeting to Messrs. Morril Wills and Roy Raymond. Ground was broken in front of the Telephone central in the morning and by night the excavation to the river had been nearly completed.